HENLEAZE BOOK

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THE LATEST LOCAL HISTORY NEWS IN THE HENLEAZE AREA

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About Us

The Henleaze Book aims to:

  1. Research and find out more local, social and family history with voluntary help from past and present residents and anyone who is interested in the Henleaze area of Bristol and its environs.

  2. Respond to the needs of people to build on/or improve facilities in its local community

  3. Produce a monthly email newsletter with the latest local history on the area and also help to create and publish books with Henleaze Connections.

This group started with four members in the late 1980s – Veronica Bowerman, Sylvia Kelly, Ron Lyne and Elizabeth Herring. Following the information researched by the group about the area and also from the facts provided by past and present residents the first dedicated publication solely about the history of Henleaze was published in 1991. A lot of interest was therefore generated and the first edition of the book sold out within a couple of weeks.

OFFICIAL COVID-19

Links to help

OBTAIN UP TO DATE INFORMATION

PLEASE SHARE. You could help save lives!

NB Summarised information about which local businesses in the Henleaze area of Bristol are operating during the lockdown period and how to make contact is now available on the Henleaze Society’s website

STOP PRESS

Members of the PHPG (Phoenix Hedge Preservation Group) were contacted by a journalist from Scotland asking for information on the medieval hedge in Bristol.

HOW HEDGES BECAME THE UNOFFICIAL EMBLEM OF GREAT BRITAIN

This appeared in the November 2020 edition of the Smithsonian Magazine.

A link to the BBC News item of 9 May 2013 officially recognising the 800-year-old hedge was also included in the article.